Wednesday, 13 May 2015

A counter-terrorism bill including plans for extremism disruption orders designed to restrict those trying to radicalise young people is to be included in the Queen’s speech, David Cameron will tell the national security council on Wednesday.
The orders, the product of an extremism task force set up by the prime minister, were proposed during the last parliament in March, but were largely vetoed by the Liberal Democrats on the grounds of free speech. They were subsequently revived in the Conservative manifesto.
The measures would give the police powers to apply to the high court for an order to limit the “harmful activities” of an extremist individual. The definition of harmful is to include a risk of public disorder, a risk of harassment, alarm or distress or creating a “threat to the functioning of democracy”.
The aim is to catch not just those who spread or incite hatred on the grounds of gender, race or religion but also those who undertake harmful activities for the “purpose of overthrowing democracy”.
They would include a ban on broadcasting and a requirement to submit to the police in advance any proposed publication on the web and social media or in print. The bill will also contain plans for banning orders for extremist organisations which seek to undermine democracy or use hate speech in public places, but it will fall short of banning on the grounds of provoking hatred.

The measures would give the police powers to apply to the high court for an order to limit the “harmful activities” of an extremist individual. The definition of harmful is to include a risk of public disorder, a risk of harassment, alarm or distress or creating a “threat to the functioning of democracy”.
“There are people out there, sadly, who are seeking to divide us,” May told the Today programme. “We are a government of one nation. We want to bring people together and ensure we are living as one society, but there are those who are trying to promote hatred and intolerance, seeking to divide us into them and us, and undermine our British values.”
May said the definition of extremism would be clearly set out in the legislation and that the bill would cover extremism of all sorts – including neo-nazism as well as Islamist extremism – which were “seeking to undermine the very values that make us a great country to live in, that make us a pluralistic society”.
So the "racists" who warned us about the consequences of allowing brown people to colonise Europe, the "Islamophobes" who warned that Muslims in Europe would wage jihad against the kuffar here just as they have everywhere else are now to be punished for being right. Those who caused the problem and those who saw the problem coming are morally equivalent. Defending yourself is no more morally upright than attacking someone else.






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